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Tag Archives: NEBOSH IGC

Confused about Carrier? Join @ ASHEI kochi Nebosh | IOSH | MFA | ISO | IADC. Best for Diploma/Engineers call us:9745126655,9447609617 training by Anil Menon, CMIOSH
Urgent Requirement for Qatar – ASHEI

Urgent Requirement for Qatar!!

(please share to other groups. No service charges)

i) HSE Specialist – 3

ii) Fire Specialist – 3

iii)HSE chemical specialist – 1

iv)Safety officer – 1

v)Radiation Specialist

Qualification : Engineering Graduates with Nebosh IGC minimum (Sl ii). Fire specific qualification/IGC (Sl iii) Chemical engineering (Sl iv). Safety qualification (Sl v) BTECH & NEBOSH IGC.

Experience of 4 years and above preferred.

ASHEI students will be given priority

Only candidates who can join immediately need to apply. Initial interview will be conducted at ASHEI – Kochi for eligible candidates.

Salary as per international standard and qualifications.

send you cv to hr@asheinstitute.com

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IOSH MANAGING SAFELY Version 5.0 @ ASHEI KOCHI 8606108000

IOSH MANAGING SAFELY Version 5.0 @ ASHEI 

The Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) is a British organization for health and safety professionals. The IOSH Managing Safely Certificate Course focuses on specially training the managers and supervisors of any organization. The course helps them comprehend and adopt high standard occupational health and safety principles and practices in their particular work culture.
Who is the course for?
Anyone in a management role.
Why it works?
• Designed for managers and supervisors in any sector and in any country
• Provides the knowledge and tools required to manage safely
• Peace of mind from training that’s designed and quality-controlled by us
• Flexibility of delivery that suits your business
• Internationally recognised and respected certification
• Efficient and effective learning – health, safety and environmental basics covered in a single programme
What to expect?
• Memorable and thought-provoking facts and case studies
• Modules backed by clear examples and recognisable scenarios
• Summaries to reinforce key points
• Checklists and materials supplied for subsequent use in the workplace
• Interactive quiz and discussions
• Practical exercise based on the operations of a real business
• Successful delegates awarded a Managing Safely certificate
Top 5 business benefits
• Greater productivity – fewer hours lost to sickness and accidents
• Improved organisation-wide safety awareness culture and appreciation of safety measures
• Active staff involvement to improve the workplace
• Internationally recognised certification for managers and supervisors
• Enhanced reputation within the supply chain
Top 5 delegate benefits
• Ensures you can assess and control risks and hazards
• Ensures you understand your own responsibilities for safety and health
• Enables you to investigate incidents
• Empowers you to measure your own performance
• Allows for personal reflections on good practice

4 Days course
Introduces managerial level professionals to effective management of safety and health at workplace, last day of the course you have to write an exam.

For further assistance contact me on 9447609617

ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute 
IOSH|NEBOSH|BSC|MFA|OHSAS|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 94 476096 17, 85 928593 85
Email : info@asheinstitute.com, ashei.neena@gmail.com
Web : www.asheinstitute.com

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Health And Safety Auditing In Ernakulam / Cochin

Health And Safety Auditing In Ernakulam / Cochin

OHSAS 18001:2007  IRCA Approved LA Training Course @ ASHEI Kochi

Training By ANILKUMAR TS MENON

Start Date: 24th August 2017

End Date: 28th August 2017

Time: 9am to 5.30 pm

Venue: ASHE Institute Kochi

Registration Open!!!

Call: 9447609617, 8606108000, 9745126655

https://www.facebook.com/events/1891056117823960/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A5%2C%22page_id_source%22%3A699488246832451%2C%22action_history%22%3A[%7B%22surface%22%3A%22page%22%2C%22mechanism%22%3A%22main_list%22%2C%22extra_data%22%3A%22%7B%5C%22page_id%5C%22%3A699488246832451%2C%5C%22tour_id%5C%22%3Anull%7D%22%7D]%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D

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SCAFFOLDER VACANCY FOR DUBAI DRY DOCK

URGENT VACANCY FOR DUBAI DRY DOCK

DESIGNATION: SCAFFOLDERS

QUALIFICATION:  2-3 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN SHIPYARD DOING SCAFFOLDING WORK & TRAINING FROM RECOGNISED TRAINING CENTRE

PACKAGE:  1400 AED + FOOD & ACCOMMODATION + OT
5 DAYS WORK & 2 DAYS OFF

Qualified candidates can sent CV to hr@asheinstitute.com

Scaffolder training @ ashei
Date: 12th August 2017
Time: 10 am
Venue: ASHE Institute
For registration & details: 9447609617, 8606108000
www.asheinstitute.com

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Safety officer Vacancy @ ASHEI

Safety officer Vacancy @ ASHEI

Job Title: Safety officer – 5 Numbers
Job Location: Kuwait
Education Qualification:
1) Diploma/Degree in relevant discipline with certificate in HSE or equivalent.
2) NEBOSH / OHSA / IOSH certificate or diploma in safety is an added advantage.
Salary: 200 – 300 Kuwait Dinar
Experience: 5 Years
Email: hr@kmpconsultant.com
Tel: 9840880251
Consultancy: KMP Consulting Engineers
NOTE : Shall have a valid Kuwaiti Driving License.

 

ASHEI is pleased to announce NEBOSH IGC going to start from 07th Aug 2017
Last Date of Registration : 27/07/2017
NOW ATTEMPT YOUR NEBOSH IGC PAPERS ONE BY ONE!
Important Information:
Trainer: Dr. Anilkumar TS Menon CMIOSH , FIIRSM & NEBOSH Approved Trainer
Examination: 30& 31 st AUG 2017
We don’t compromise on Quality & Standards. Inquire 1st before enrolling to the course providers. For guidance and career counseling do not hesitate to contact us.
ASHEI
1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025
Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385
info@asheinstitute.com

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NEBOSH GC3 – HEALTH AND SAFETY PRACTICAL APPLICATION – UNIT : III

Guidance and information for candidates

This document provides comprehensive guidance on the presentation and submission of the Unit GC3 practical application. It includes guidance on the structure and style of the report. Candidates should study this document carefully before submitting their practical application.
The guidance should be read carefully in conjunction with the practical application mark scheme, which is included in this guidance document, to provide a clear guide to the requirements of the practical application.

Introduction

The aim of this unit is to assess a candidate’s ability to complete successfully two activities:
· To carry out, unaided, a safety inspection of a workplace, identifying the more common hazards, deciding whether they are adequately controlled and, where necessary, suggesting appropriate and cost effective control measures.
· To prepare a report that persuasively urges management to take appropriate action, explaining why such action is needed (including reference to possible breaches of standards and identifying practical legislation and control measures that should be implemented.
This will require candidates to apply the knowledge and understanding gained from their studies of elements of Units NGC1 and GC2 or Units IGC1 and GC2 in a practical environment and to carry out an evaluation of information gathered during the inspection. The time allowed to complete the assessment is not restricted but candidates should aim to complete the inspection and the report in two hours. The practical application may be submitted in the candidate’s own handwriting or be word processed.
The submission must include:
· completed observation sheets covering a number and range of hazards and good practice, identifying suitable control measures and timescales;
· an introduction and executive summary;
· main findings of the completed inspection;
· conclusions which summarise the main issues identified in the candidate’s workplace;
· completed recommendations table.
The practical application must be carried out in the candidate’s own workplace. The workplace should be large enough to provide a sufficient range of hazards in the areas covered to provide an adequate range for identification. If the workplace is very large, in order that the practical application is manageable the candidate should limit the area considered.
Where the candidate does not have access to a workplace, the course provider should be consulted to help in making arrangements for the candidate to carry out the practical application at suitable premises. Providers seeking to run the practical in this way should contact NEBOSH for advice and approval.
Management at the premises should be consulted to ensure the candidate can carry out the inspection without endangering their own health and safety.
Where confidentiality requires, locations and company names may be omitted from the report, or alternatively guidance should be sought from NEBOSH.
Candidates do not require supervision when carrying out the practical application but the candidate must sign a declaration that the submission is their own work (Appendix 1). If this declaration is not submitted the candidate’s result may be declared void. A signature can be electronic or can be faxed.
Candidates must note that accredited course providers cannot comment on practical applications before submission or marking.
Candidates, employers and internal assessors should be aware that the status of the inspection undertaken to fulfil the requirements of Unit GC3 is for educational purposes only.

Date of Assessment

Assessment of the practical unit (GC3) must normally take place within 10 working days of (before or after) the date of the NGC1/IGC1 and/or GC2 written papers (the ‘date of the examination’). The results sheet completed by the accredited course provider must reach NEBOSH by no later than 15 working days after the date of the examination (Appendix 2).
If a candidate is absent from the written papers because of illness corroborated by a doctor’s note, but successfully completes the GC3 unit within the 10 working day deadline, the result will stand. If a candidate is unable to complete the GC3 unit under similar circumstances, NEBOSH may allow it to be taken at a later date beyond the normal 10 working day deadline.
The accredited course provider should advise the candidate of the latest date by which the completed report and observation sheets must be received by the course provider for marking. It is the responsibility of the course provider to ensure that the results of the practical (GC3) are available to NEBOSH by no later than 15 working days after the date of the examination for NGC1/IGC1 and/or GC2.
Completion of study for both NGC1 and GC2 or IGC1 and GC2 is recommended in order to undertake the practical application unit GC3.
Candidates planning to post their reports to the course provider should be reminded of the need to guard against loss in the post by sending their work by trackable delivery. Candidates are therefore advised to retain copies of both their completed observation sheets and report.

Marking

Practical applications will be marked by an internal assessor – a person proposed to NEBOSH by an accredited course provider and approved by NEBOSH. Internal assessors will be at least Grad IOSH of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health or equivalent and working towards chartered membership, CMIOSH, (or similar).
A marking sheet (Appendix 3) will be completed by the internal assessor for each candidate and attached to the candidate’s report. The total percentage mark for each candidate will be transferred to a results sheet (Appendix 2) and returned to NEBOSH by no later than 15 working days after the examination date of NGC1/ICG1 and/or GC2.
Candidates must achieve the pass standard (60%) in this unit in order to satisfy the criteria for the qualification.
Moderation
Marked GC3 assessments are subject to external moderation by NEBOSH to monitor the standard being set and marks awarded by the internal assessor may be adjusted accordingly.
The observation sheets and report should not be sent to NEBOSH unless they are called in. However, the observation sheet and report should be retained with the mark sheet for each candidate for at least six weeks following the date of issue by NEBOSH of the examination results to which they relate. Practical applications may be called in at any time from the date of examination until six weeks after the issue of results.
Candidates may lodge an EAR (enquiry about result) within the timeframe as advised on their URN (unit result notification).

Retention of practical samples by accredited course providers

NEBOSH monitors the consistency of internal assessment by accredited course providers (eg practicals marked by the course provider) over time. Accredited course providers are therefore required to retain representative samples of practical applications (eg high pass, low pass, refer) for each standard sitting or cohort for a rolling three year period.
The sample of practicals to be retained by accredited course providers will be no more than 24 scripts per year per qualification, but providers may choose to retain more for internal quality assurance purposes. Providers should retain the archived sample for three years in a manner that makes them easily retrievable. This is intended to enable course provider staff to monitor the standards of candidate performance in the practical application over time, and make improvements to their delivery when necessary. Additionally, the samples will serve as exemplar materials for practical application assessors appointed by accredited course providers to use as guidance in their assessment decisions.
Sampling of accredited course provider-marked scripts enables NEBOSH to ensure that the standard of marking for internal assessment remains consistent over time both within and between accredited course providers. Using archived materials in this way is intended to maintain marking standards and enhance parity between the marks before and after moderation.
Other scripts should be disposed of as confidential waste.

Completion of observation sheets

Candidates will be supplied with a sufficient number of observation sheets from a course provider which may be photocopied for the purpose. An example observation sheet is given at Appendix 4. The observation sheets must be completed during the inspection. Only brief details of each hazard are required including where the hazard was located and the consequences of the hazard. For example, ‘housekeeping could be better’ does not give enough information about the particular hazard.
The observation sheets should be completed by:
· identifying, in the left hand column, any hazards, unsafe work practices and examples of good practice observed during the inspection;
· commenting in the next column, on the adequacy of existing controls and identifying any immediate and longer term remedial actions needed;
· stating, in the right hand column a reasonable timescale for the actions identified.
There should be sufficient information on the observation sheets to enable the candidate to complete a report to management on their findings. Candidates are also advised to make notes on the area inspected, including activities taking place, in order to complete the introduction to their report. Whilst poor spelling and grammar will not be marked or penalised, if the assessor is unable to read or to understand the notes made by candidates during their inspection then invariably fewer marks will be awarded than would otherwise have been the case. The practical application may be submitted in the candidate’s own handwriting or word processed.

Marking of observation sheets

Candidates are advised to refer to the marking sheet given at Appendix 3 and the marking matrix given at Appendix 6.
Range and outline of hazards and consequences (15 marks)
Candidates should outline 20 uncontrolled hazards to gain maximum marks, but are strongly recommended to outline more than 20 (but no more than 30) in case of duplication or inappropriate hazards being outlined. Candidates must demonstrate their understanding of how identified hazards have the potential to cause harm, for example, boxes stored on the floor may cause obstruction of access, egress routes and / or a potential of musculoskeletal injury if lifted. This information must be recorded in the ‘Hazards and consequences’ column. Candidates are expected to outline different types of hazards such as hazardous substances, fire, electrical, work equipment, ergonomic, housekeeping, noise, vibration, transport, manual handling and health hazards and should also consider if there are any welfare and environmental problems. At least five different types of hazard must be included for maximum marks. In addition candidates are expected to comment on situations where there is adequate control of hazards and where good practice is being observed, although candidates should place the emphasis on uncontrolled hazards. A maximum of 1 mark is available for good practice.
Candidates who repeat identical hazards will only be awarded ONE mark for that hazard (eg inadequate labelling of an unknown chemical substance). Candidates should focus on physical conditions and not on poor policies and procedures.
It is important to note that credit can only be gained in this section for clearly outlined hazards.
Identification of suitable control measures and timescales (15 marks)
Candidates are expected to give thought to what is required to immediately control the risk from each outlined hazard AND to identify the need for long term actions to control the risk.
This requires candidates to distinguish between the symptoms and the root causes of hazards.
For example, the immediate action on a spillage may be ‘clean up spillage and inform supervisor’ whereas longer term actions might include appropriate supervisor training, regular inspections, and investigation of the source of the leak. A further longer term action may be to modify the work process to tackle the root cause. The proposed control measures must not only remove or control the hazard but must also be realistic in terms of timescales. Candidates should indicate a measure of time eg supervisor training to be completed within three months.
If existing controls are in place and considered adequate, candidates should consider any measures required to maintain this level of control.
Candidates should avoid generic phrases being repeatedly used eg ‘monitor’ and ‘train staff’. Candidates should give appropriate clarification by giving examples of appropriate monitoring and the type of training required.
Candidates should be aware that if unsuitable control measures are suggested full marks cannot be awarded. Short term measures to improve housekeeping will do little to improve the lack of safety management systems and procedures evidenced by materials and equipment left lying around.
Candidates should also note that where the hazard is not clearly outlined full credit cannot be gained for control measures as assessors will be unable to determine appropriateness of the measures proposed.

Completion of report

Candidates should use the ‘Candidate report template’ given at Appendix 5 to structure their report. The length of the report should be between 700 and 1000 words and should not simply duplicate the observation sheets. Candidates can consult reference books when preparing the report, but plagiarism will be dealt with as malpractice.
The report should not contain photographs, printed text or any other extraneous material.
The report should be written in such terms that a manager would be able to take reasonable action based on facts. Reports based on unsupported generalities and those that simply reiterate the contents of the observation sheets will be awarded low marks.
Candidates should aim to complete their report in one hour.
If none of the criteria to award marks is met, then zero marks will be awarded.

Marking of report

Candidates are advised to refer to the marking sheet given at Appendix 3 and the marking matrix given at Appendix 6.

Report – Introduction and Executive Summary

Introduction providing an overview of the chosen area (5 marks)
Candidates should start with the details of the inspection, stating where and when the inspection took place. A clear and appropriate description of the chosen area and of the activities occurring in the area should be given.
Executive summary (5 marks)
The executive summary should be written after the candidate has completed the rest of the report but it should be inserted at the beginning of the report. The purpose of the executive summary is to provide a concise overview of the important points arising from the work and summarise the main conclusions and recommendations arising from it.
An executive summary should provide sufficient information to enable a busy manager to make a decision as to whether or not to read the full report and to provide a persuasive case for implementation of recommendations made.

Report – Main findings of the inspection

The main findings of the inspection should form the main body of the report and include the following aspects:
The report should be well structured, the appropriate length and not duplicate observation sheets. The report should be concise, readable and highly selective in terms of action required by management. Candidates should include balanced arguments on why action is needed and explain the effect it would have on the standards of health and safety at the workplace and the possible effects on the business overall.
Quality of interpretation of findings (15 marks)
There should be a logical progression from the hazards outlined on the observation sheets. The key issues should be appropriately selected and discussed, and should not include any hazards not outlined on the observation sheets and does not duplicate the observation sheets.
Identification of possible breaches of legislation and standards (5 marks)
Candidates should be able to identify legislation eg Manual Handling Operations Regulations, standards and conventions listed in the syllabus that may have been infringed eg Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems (ILO-OSH) 2001. Credit will also be given for reference to appropriate local standards.
Candidates must ensure that any legislation, standards or convention referred to is relevant to the area/location inspected and hazards outlined and must demonstrate a clear understanding of the reasons for the breaches. Candidates should identify a minimum of five breaches.
Persuasiveness / conciseness / technical content (10 marks)
The candidate must explain why management need to take action including clear legal, moral and financial arguments. Issues requiring urgent action by management with associated explanations containing convincing arguments why such action is needed should be included. Reference can be made to the list of observations and recommended actions, calling particular attention to any recommendations which could have a high cost in terms of finance, inconvenience or time.
Financial benefits, such as increased productivity, may also accrue from making appropriate changes to safety systems. The possible costs of not taking action should be included.

Report – Conclusions and Recommendations

Clear and concise conclusions which are clearly related to report findings and are effective in convincing management to take action (15 marks)
This section should provide a concise summary of the findings identified in the main body of the candidate’s report to persuade management to take action. The conclusions should not introduce new issues or additional factors.
Recommendations which present realistic actions to improve health and safety in the chosen area (15 marks)
Candidates must include recommendations based upon their conclusions. Recommendations must be presented using the recommendations table included at Appendix 5. The recommendations must be realistic, appropriately prioritised and have appropriate resource implications. Candidates are not expected either to know or to estimate actual costs but should demonstrate that they are aware of cost implications. For example, candidates recommending the complete resurfacing of a site roadway because of a small pothole, without commenting on its overall condition, will receive low marks. If training is recommended as a solution to a problem, candidates should indicate if this is likely to require a few hours of work-based instruction or several days of more costly off-the-job training. It is the assessment of magnitude of the cost that is important, rather than precise figures, eg candidates may refer to the number of worker hours as a measure of cost.
Recommendations must be prioritised. The most pressing issues, those which present the highest risk levels and those that can be done immediately at little or no cost, should be addressed first. Target date should be included, for example, ‘plus one week’ or ‘plus three months’.
If none of the criteria to award marks is met, then zero marks will be awarded.
1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025
Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385

NEBOSH IGC @ ASHEI KOCHI
UPCOMING TRAINING DATES
IOSH : 10/07/2017
NEBOSH IGC : 07/08/2017
NEBOSH HSW : 24/07/2017
OHSAS 18001 : 24/07/2017
MEDIC FIRST AID : 30/07/2017
IADC RIGPASS : 24/07/2017
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COMMAND WORDS FOR NEBOSH IGC – EXAM TIPS

Command word & Definition

Identify – To give reference to an item, which could be its name or title.

NB: normally a word or phrase will be sufficient, provided the reference is clear.

Give – To provide short, factual answers.

NB: normally a single word, phrase or sentence will be sufficient.

Outline – To indicate the principal features or different parts of.

NB: an exhaustive description is not required. What is sought is a brief summary of the major aspects of whatever is stated in the question.

Describe – To give a detailed written account of the distinctive features of a subject. The account should be factual, without any attempt to explain.

When describing a subject (or object) a test of sufficient detail would be that another person would be able to visualize what you are describing.

Explain – To provide an understanding. To make an idea or relationship clear.

NB: this command word is testing the candidate’s ability to know or understand why or how something happens. Is often associated with the words ‘how’ or ‘why’.

Responding to command words in questions

It is important to read the whole question and to understand what the question requires as the command word on its own will need to be reinforced by the remainder of the question.

Many candidates miss out on gaining marks because they do not read the question carefully enough and do not think about their answer thoroughly before writing it down.

Candidates need to think about each question.

• What is the command word?

• What do I need to say to gain marks?

• What is or is not relevant to the question?

In many cases a brief answer plan is an essential aid to ensuring that answers are well thought out and structured.

NEBOSH applies a ‘positive marking’ approach; that is, marks are awarded for correct material in candidates’ answers, rather than being deducted for incorrect or missing material.

In order to give further direction as to the detail of information required by the command word in a question, examples are given below both for general knowledge and for the NGC1 syllabus.

Identify

Applying identify to a non-syllabus related common subject:

Q1. Identify FOUR kitchen appliances.

Q2. Identify FOUR types of bicycle.

Sufficient answers would include:

A1. Toaster

Electric kettle

Microwave cooker

Dishwasher

A2. Mountain bike

Racing bike

Penny-farthing

Tandem

Note that giving only one or two word answers provides a clear reference and therefore is sufficient to satisfy an identify question.

Applying identify to syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would include:

Identify FOUR hazards associated with excavations.

Collapse of the sides

Water ingress

Falling materials

Underground services

Identify FOUR mechanical hazards associated with machinery.

Entanglement

Drawing in and trapping

Friction or abrasion

Stabbing or puncture

Identify FOUR types of safety sign.

Prohibition signs

Warning signs

Mandatory signs

Emergency or safe condition signs

Again, answers are limited to a brief phrase or in some cases just two words but do give clear reference.

Outline

To gain the marks for the outline example questions below, the same breadth of answer is required as for an identify answer, but now, additional information will be required to satisfy the depth of an outline.

Applying outline to the same non-syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would include:

Outline FOUR kitchen appliances.

Toaster

• Accommodates slices of bread, ejects as toast when ready.

Electric kettle

• 1 to 2 litre capacity, boils water. Can be cordless.

Microwave cooker

Heats food rapidly using short wavelength radio waves.

Dishwasher

• Dirty tableware placed in baskets. Mixture of high pressure water and detergent automatically cleans.

Outline FOUR types of bicycle.

Mountain bike

• Robust bicycle with deep tread tyres, suspension and several gear choices.

Racing bike

• Lightweight frame with drop handlebars and maybe fixed gearing.

Penny-farthing

• Vintage device with very large front wheel and small rear wheel.

Tandem

• Bicycle designed for two people with two seats and two sets of pedals.

Applying outline to the same syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would include:

Outline FOUR hazards associated with excavations.

Collapse of the sides

• Unsupported trench or incorrect angle of the sides.

Water ingress

• Through heavy rain or burst water main.

Falling materials

• Spoil dug from excavation or materials and tools stored at ground level could fall in.

Underground services

• Contact or rupturing of electricity, gas or water utilities.

Outline FOUR mechanical hazards associated with machinery.

Entanglement

• On rotating parts.

Drawing in and trapping

• Between counter rotation rollers, or pulley belts and wheels.

Friction or abrasion

• Contact with fast moving surfaces.

Stabbing or puncture

• From ejected objects or flying objects.

Outline FOUR types of safety sign.

Prohibition signs

• Circular with red border, red diagonal bar and black symbol.

Warning signs

Triangular, yellow background, black border and symbol.

Mandatory signs

• Circular, blue background, white border and white symbol.

Emergency or safe condition signs

• Rectangular, green background, white border and white symbol.

Again, the identify answer (shown in bold) gives the breadth required and the additional information given in the bullet point satisfies the required depth for an outline.

Describe

Applying describe to the non-syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would be:

Describe a microwave cooker.

An oblong box shaped object, approximately 30cm tall, 30cm deep and 60cm long. There is a single hinged door at the front, typically see through. The door opens outwards and inside there is a space to place a plate or dish and a microwave transmitter is located above. Outside, on the front there will be normally two controls to set the power and cooking time.

Describe a penny-farthing bicycle.

A manually propelled vintage bicycle consisting of a very large wheel at the front and a much smaller wheel at the back. The wheels are connected by a frame that supports a seat above the front wheel and handlebars to steer. Pedals are connected directly to the centre of the front wheel.

Applying describe to a syllabus subject:

Describe the mechanical hazards associated with abench grinder.

An entanglement hazard would be associated with the rotating spindle that the abrasive wheel is mounted on. Drawing in and trapping is associated with the gap between the tool rest and the rotating abrasive wheel. Friction or abrasion hazards would be associated with the surface of the rotating abrasive wheel and stabbing or puncture hazards could be created by flying fragments or pieces of ejected broken wheel.

In all of the describe answers above, no attempt is made to explain how a microwave cooker heats food, why the front wheel of a penny-farthing is so much larger than the rear wheel or how a person could be injured using an abrasive wheel.

Explain

Applying explain to a non-syllabus subject:

Sufficient answers would include:

Explain how a microwave cooker heats up food.

The frequency of microwaves used in a microwave cooker is sufficient to cause water molecules in food to vibrate. Vibrating molecules hit other water molecules and put them into the same vibration and therefore this vibration of molecules is converted into heat.

Explain why there is a very large front wheel on a penny-farthing.

By having a large front wheel, the peripheral (rim speed) of the wheel is much faster than the rotation of the pedals at the centre. This results in faster forward speed per pedal rotation. Also a larger wheel is more suitable for riding on cobbled streets or rough ground.

Applying explain to a syllabus subject:

Explain how sensitive protective equipment (trip device) can reduce the risk of contact with moving parts of machinery.

Sensitive protective equipment is designed to identify the presence of a person or body part within the danger zone of machinery. Examples of such devices include pressure mats and light beams that are connected to the machine controls and would stop the machine rapidly should a person or body part be detected.

Give

Applying give to a non-syllabus subject:

Identify FOUR European cities AND give an example of a tourist attraction in EACH.

London – eg Buckingham Palace

Paris – eg Eiffel Tower

Pisa – eg Leaning Tower

Rome – eg Colosseum

Applying give to a syllabus subject:

Identify FOUR types of safety sign AND give an examplein EACH case.

Prohibition signs – eg No smoking

Warning signs – eg Caution hot surface

Mandatory signs – eg Wear ear protection

Emergency or safe condition signs – eg first-aid box

ASHEI

1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025

Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385

info@asheinstitute.com

UPCOMING TRAINING DATES

IOSH : 3/07/2017
NEBOSH IGC : 07/08/2017
NEBOSH HSW : 24/07/2017
OHSAS 18001 : 24/07/2017
MEDIC FIRST AID : 30/06/2017
IADC RIGPASS : 24/07/2017

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VIOLENCE @ WORKPLACE

What is workplace violence?

Workplace violence is violence or the threat of violence against workers.

It can occur at or outside the workplace and can range from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and homicide, one of the leading causes of job-related deaths. However it manifests itself, workplace violence is a growing concern for employers and employees nationwide.

Who is vulnerable?

2 million workers are victims of workplace violence each year. Workplace violence can strike anywhere, and no one is immune. Some workers, however, are at increased risk. Among them are workers who exchange money with the public; deliver passengers, goods, or services; or work alone or in small groups, during late night or early morning hours, in high-crime areas, or in community settings and homes where they have extensive contact with the public.

This group includes health-care and social service workers such as visiting nurses, psychiatric evaluators, and probation officers; community workers such as gas and water utility employees, phone and cable TV installers, and letter carriers; retail workers; and taxi drivers.

What can these employers do to help protect these employees?

The best protection employers can offer is to establish a zero-tolerance policy toward workplace violence against or by their employees. The employer should establish a workplace violence prevention program or incorporate the information into an existing accident prevention program, employee handbook, or manual of standard operating procedures. It is critical to ensure that all employees know the policy and understand that all claims of workplace violence will be investigated and remedied promptly.

In addition, employers can offer additional protections such as the following:

 Provide safety education for employees so they know what conduct is not acceptable,what to do if they witness or are subjected to workplace violence, and how to protect themselves.

 Secure the workplace. Where appropriate to the business, install video surveillance, extra lighting, and alarm systems and minimize access by outsiders through identification badges, electronic keys, and guards.

 Provide drop safes to limit the amount of cash on hand. Keep a minimal amount of cash in registers during evenings and latenight hours.

 Equip field staff with cellular phones and hand-held alarms or noise devices, and require them to prepare a daily work plan and keep a contact person informed of their location throughout the day. Keep employer provided vehicles properly maintained.

 Instruct employees not to enter any location where they feel unsafe. Introduce a “buddy system” or provide an escort service or police assistance in potentially dangerous situations or at night.

 Develop policies and procedures covering visits by home health-care providers. Address the conduct of home visits, the presence of others in the home during visits, and the worker’s right to refuse to provide services in a clearly hazardous situation.

How can the employees protect themselves?

Nothing can guarantee that an employee will not become a victim of workplace violence. These steps, however, can help reduce the odds:

 Learn how to recognize, avoid, or diffuse potentially violent situations by attending personal safety training programs.

 Alert supervisors to any concerns about safety or security and report all incidents immediately in writing.

 Avoid traveling alone into unfamiliar locations or situations whenever possible.

 Carry only minimal money and required identification into community settings.

What should employers do following an incident of workplace violence?

 Encourage employees to report and log all incidents and threats of workplace violence.

 Provide prompt medical evaluation and treatment after the incident.

 Report violent incidents to the local police promptly.

 Inform victims of their legal right to prosecute perpetrators.

 Discuss the circumstances of the incident with staff members. Encourage employees to share information about ways to avoid similar situations in the future.

 Offer stress debriefing sessions and post traumatic counseling services to help workers recover from a violent incident.

 Investigate all violent incidents and threats, monitor trends in violent incidents by type or circumstance, and institute corrective actions.

 Discuss changes in the program during regular employee meetings.

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